Gates Open at 9:00AM & Close at 5:00PM | Air Show 11:00AM – 4:00PM (No admittance after 2:30PM)
Sponsored in part by:
FREE AIR SHOW TO PUBLIC THUNDER OF NIAGARA INTERNATIONAL AIR SHOW June 9-10, 2018

Display Aircraft

Last Update: 06/07/2018 @ 10:39 PM ET.

In addition to the amazing USAF Thunderbirds and Canadian Forces Snowbirds, you will see some of the best civilian and military pilots in the world – flying for you. Plus, one of the largest displays of civilian & military aircraft in North America (50+ planes).

Please note: The aircraft pictured below might not be the exact paint scheme or tail flash shown. All display aircraft are subject to change without notice.

Refuelers

KC-135 Stratotanker

kc135-stratotanker

“The KC-135 Stratotanker provides the core aerial refueling capability for the United States Air Force and has excelled in this role for more than 50 years. This unique asset enhances the Air Force’s capability to accomplish its primary mission of global reach. It also provides aerial refueling support to Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nation aircraft. The KC-135 is also capable of transporting litter and ambulatory patients using patient support pallets during aeromedical evacuations.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104524/kc-135-stratotanker.aspx


KC-10 Extender

kc10

“The KC-10 Extender is an Air Mobility Command advanced tanker and cargo aircraft designed to provide increased global mobility for U.S. armed forces. Although the KC-l0’s primary mission is aerial refueling, it can combine the tasks of a tanker and cargo aircraft by refueling fighters and simultaneously carry the fighter support personnel and equipment on overseas deployments. The KC-10 is also capable of transporting litter and ambulatory patients using patient support pallets during aeromedical evacuations.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104520/kc-10-extender.aspx


CARGO

C-17 Globemaster III

c17-globemaster3

“The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force. The C-17 is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area. The aircraft can perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions and can transport litters and ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations when required. The inherent flexibility and performance of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104523/c-17-globemaster-iii.aspx


C-5 Galaxy

c5-a-b-c-galaxy

“The C-5 Galaxy is one of the largest aircraft in the world and the largest airlifter in the Air Force inventory. The aircraft can carry a fully equipped combat-ready military unit to any point in the world on short notice and then provide the supplies required to help sustain the fighting force.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104492/c-5-abc-galaxy-c-5m-super-galaxy.aspx


C-130H2 Hercules

“The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the tactical portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for airdropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. The C-130 operates throughout the U.S. Air Force, serving with Air Mobility Command, Air Force Special Operations Command, Air Combat Command, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Pacific Air Forces, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve Command, fulfilling a wide range of operational missions in both peace and war situations. Basic and specialized versions of the aircraft airframe perform a diverse number of roles, including airlift support, Antarctic ice resupply, aeromedical missions, weather reconnaissance, aerial spray missions, firefighting duties for the U.S. Forest Service and natural disaster relief missions.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/About-Us/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/104517/c-130-hercules/


WC-130J Hurricane Hunter

“The WC-130J is a C-130J transport configured with palletized weather instrumentation that collects weather data and is capable of staying aloft almost 18 hours at an optimum cruise speed of more than 300 mph. The WC-130 provides vital tropical cyclone forecasting information. It penetrates tropical cyclones and hurricanes at altitudes ranging from 500 to 10,000 feet (151.7 to 3,033.3 meters) above the ocean surface depending upon the intensity of the storm. An average weather reconnaissance mission might last 11 hours and cover almost 3,500 miles while the crew collects and reports weather data. The WC-130J carries a minimal crew of five: pilot, co-pilot, navigator, aerial reconnaissance weather officer and weather reconnaissance loadmaster.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/About-Us/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/104561/wc-130-hercules/


NAVY/MARINE CORPS

F/A-18C Hornet

super-hornet

“All-weather fighter and attack aircraft. The single-seat F/A-18 Hornet is the nation’s first strike-fighter. It was designed for traditional strike applications such as interdiction and close air support without compromising its fighter capabilities. With its excellent fighter and self-defense capabilities, the F/A-18 at the same time increases strike mission survivability and supplements the F-14 Tomcat in fleet air defense. F/A-18 Hornets are currently operating in 37 tactical squadrons from air stations world-wide, and from 10 aircraft carriers. The U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels Flight Demonstration Squadron proudly flies them. The Hornet comprises the aviation strike force for seven foreign customers including Canada, Australia, Finland, Kuwait, Malaysia, Spain and Switzerland.” Source/Link: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=1100&tid=1200&ct=1


MV-22 Osprey

Osprey Horizontial Flight

The Osprey is extraordinary! It can hover and takeoff like a helicopter and then “tilt” it’s configuration to fly like an aircraft. This allows the aircraft and it’s crew a wide range of mission capabilities in all weather conditions. Source/Link: https://www.mag26.marines.mil/MAG-26-Units/VMM-261/


E-2 Hawkeye

“The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordination, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. An integral component of the Carrier Strike Group air wing, the E-2 uses computerized radar, Identification Friend or Foe and electronic surveillance sensors to provide early warning, threat analysis against potentially hostile air and surface targets.
Beyond the battle group, the Hawkeye’ command and control capability makes it a multi-mission platform through its ability to coordinate concurrent missions that may arise during a single flight, to include: airborne strike, land force support, rescue operations, managing a reliable communications network between widely dispersed nodes and support for drug interdiction operations.” Source/Link: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=1100&tid=700&ct=1


T-45A Goshawk

t45a-goshawk

“The T-45A Goshawk is a tandem-seat, carrier capable, jet trainer whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots. The T-45A aircraft, the Navy version of the British Aerospace Hawk aircraft, is used for intermediate and advanced portions of the Navy/Marine Corps pilot training program for jet carrier aviation and tactical strike missions. The T-45A has replaced the T-2 Buckeye trainer and the TA-4 trainer with an integrated training system that includes the T-45A Goshawk aircraft, operations and instrument fighter simulators, academics, and training integration system. There are two versions of T-45 aircraft currently in operational use at this time, the T-45A and T-45C derivatives. The T-45A, which became operational in 1991, contains an analog design cockpit while the new T-45C (began delivery in December 1997) is built around a new digital “glass cockpit” design.” Source/Link: http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=1100&tid=2000&ct=1


NASA

DHC-6 Twin Otter

Owner/Operator: NASA Glenn Research Center
Type: Conventional Aircraft Duration: 3 hours (payload and weather dependent)
Useful Payload: 3,600 lbs Gross Take-off Weight: 11,000 lbs
Onboard Operators: 2-4 (plus two flight crew)
Max Altitude: 25,000 Air Speed: 140 knots Range: 450 Nmi Power: 200A at 28Vdc

Source/Link: https://airbornescience.nasa.gov/aircraft/Twin_Otter_-_GRC
Photo Credit: By John Davies – CYOW Airport Watch [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html) or GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons


FIGHTERS

F-15E Strike Eagle

f15-strike-eagle

“The F-15E Strike Eagle is a superior next generation multi-role strike fighter that is available today. Its unparalleled range, persistence and weapons load make it the backbone of the U.S. Air Force (USAF). A complement of the latest advanced avionics systems gives the Strike Eagle the capability to perform air-to-air or air-to-surface missions at all altitudes, day or night, in any weather.” Credit/Link: Boeing, http://www.boeing.com/boeing/defense-space/military/f15/


A-10 Thunderbolt II

a10-thunderbolt

“The A-10 Thunderbolt II, also known as the Warthog, is a twin-engine aircraft that provides close-air support of ground forces and employs a wide variety of conventional munitions, including general purpose bombs. The simple, effective and survivable single-seat aircraft can be used against all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The aircraft is currently supporting operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.” Credit: Boeing, http://www.boeing.com/boeing/defense-space/support/maintenance/a10/index.page


F-15C Eagle

f15c-eagle

“The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, after more than 25 years of service, was still the U.S. Air Force’s premier fighter as the year 2000 approached. It is the only aircraft in the U.S. Air Force arsenal capable of launching the ASAT anti-satellite missile. It also serves with the air forces of Israel, Japan and Saudi Arabia. The F-15 constantly is upgraded to include state-of-the-art equipment. It can penetrate enemy defenses and can outperform and outfight any current or projected enemy. The Eagle’s air superiority is due to its advanced avionics, its range and weaponry, and its unprecedented maneuverability. One person can effectively perform air-to-air combat using its advanced systems to detect, acquire, track and attack enemy aircraft.” Credit: Boeing, http://www.boeing.com/boeing/history/mdc/eagle.page


MQ-9 Reaper

mq-9-reaper

“The MQ-9 Reaper is an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft that is employed primarily as an intelligence-collection asset and secondarily against dynamic execution targets. Given its significant loiter time, wide-range sensors, multi-mode communications suite, and precision weapons — it provides a unique capability to perform strike, coordination, and reconnaissance against high-value, fleeting, and time-sensitive targets.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104470/mq-9-reaper.aspx


F-16 Fighting Falcon

f-16-fighting-falcon

“The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a compact, multi-role fighter aircraft. It is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack. It provides a relatively low-cost, high-performance weapon system for the United States and allied nations. In an air combat role, the F-16’s maneuverability and combat radius (distance it can fly to enter air combat, stay, fight and return) exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles (860 kilometers), deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft, and return to its starting point. An all-weather capability allows it to accurately deliver ordnance during non-visual bombing conditions.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104505/f-16-fighting-falcon.aspx


BOMBERS

B-52 Stratofortress

b52-stratofortress

“The B-52 is a long-range, heavy bomber that can perform a variety of missions. The bomber is capable of flying at high subsonic speeds at altitudes up to 50,000 feet (15,166.6 meters). It can carry nuclear or precision guided conventional ordnance with worldwide precision navigation capability.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104465/b-52-stratofortress.aspx


TRAINERS

T-38 Talon

“The T-38 Talon is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its design, economy of operations, ease of maintenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. Air Education and Training Command is the primary user of the T-38 for joint specialized undergraduate pilot training. Air Combat Command, Air Force Materiel Command and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration also use the T-38A in various roles.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104569/t-38-talon.aspx


T-6 Texan II

“Before being formally named in 1997, the T-6A was identified in a 1989 Department of Defense Trainer Aircraft Master Plan as the aircraft portion of the Joint Primary Aircraft Training System, or JPATS. The system includes a suite of simulators, training devices and a training integration management system. On Feb. 5, 1996, Raytheon was awarded the JPATS acquisition and support contracts. The first operational T-6A arrived at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, in May 2000. The full rate production contract was awarded in December 2001. Air Force production of the aircraft was completed in 2010. The T-6A is used to train JPPT students, providing the basic skills necessary to progress to one of four training tracks: the Air Force bomber-fighter or the Navy strike track, the Air Force airlift-tanker or Navy maritime track, the Air Force or Navy turboprop track and the Air Force-Navy helicopter track.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/About-Us/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/104548/t-6a-texan-ii/


T-1A Jayhawk

t1a-jayhawk

“The T-1A Jayhawk is a medium-range, twin-engine jet trainer used in the advanced phase of specialized undergraduate pilot training for students selected to fly airlift or tanker aircraft. It is also used to support navigator training for the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and international services. The swept-wing T-1A is a military version of the Beech 400A. It has cockpit seating for an instructor and two students and is powered by twin turbofan engines capable of an operating speed of 538 mph.  The T-1A differs from its commercial counterpart with structural enhancements that provide for increased bird strike resistance and an additional fuselage fuel tank.” Source/Link: http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104542/t-1a-jayhawk.aspx


BAC Strikemaster

“The BAC 167 Strikemaster was a further development of the Jet Provost, designed and built in the 1950’s by Hunting Percival in Luton. The Jet Provost was primarily a jet powered trainer for the RAF but it was also a successful light attack aircraft which saw success in the Middle-eastern export market.
The Jet Provost T5 production continued alongside the development of the Strikemaster and the first prototype (G-27-8) flew from Warton on 26th October 1967.
Strikemaster was a weaponised version with an uprated Rolls-Royce Viper turbo-jet engine, a strengthened airframe and wing hard-points and fuel tanks together with a completely new communications and navigational system in the cockpit alongside dual ejector seats.
Initially marketed as a counter-insurgency aircraft, the Strikemaster also maintained its advanced trainer profile although most Middle-eastern users opted for the militarised version. Its rough airfield capability and low-maintenance costs made it a favourite amongst many third world governments.” Source/Link: https://www.baesystems.com/en/heritage/bac-strikemaster


L-39 Albatros

L-39

The Aero L-39 Albatros is a high-performance jet trainer developed in Czechoslovakia by Aero Vodochody. It was designed during the 1960s as a replacement for the Aero L-29 Delfín as a principal training aircraft. The L-39 Albatros has the distinction of being the first of the second-generation jet trainers to be produced, as well as being the first trainer aircraft to be equipped with a turbofan powerplant. The type was exported to a wide range of countries as a military trainer.
The L-39 Albatros later served as the basis for the updated L-59 Super Albatros, as well as the L-139 (prototype L-39 with Garrett TFE731 engine). A further development of the design, designated as the L-159 ALCA, entered production in 1997. To date, more than 2,800 L-39s have served with over 30 air forces around the world. The Albatros is the most widely used jet trainer in the world; in addition to performing basic and advanced pilot training, it has also flown combat missions in a light-attack role. The design never received a NATO reporting name. Source/Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aero_L-39_Albatros


WARBIRDS

B-17G “Movie Memphis Belle”

B-17_050202-F-1234P-108-307x230

“The Movie Memphis Belle was the star of the 1990 Hollywood film, “The Memphis Belle” featuring an all- star cast including Matthew Modine, Tate Donovan, Harry Connick, Jr. and John Lithgow. The film was a fictionalized story of the 25th and last mission of the Memphis Belle during World War II while based in England.
Manufactured by Boeing and primarily operated by the Army 8th Airforce during WWII, the B-17’s were the first heavy bombers to penetrate Germany in January 1943.
The Memphis Belle and her crew were not only famous for being the first B-17 crew to successfully complete the typical 25 mission tour of duty but were also able to return from every mission with every member of their crew.” Source/Link: https://m.facebook.com/warplanemuseum/posts/10153759962416072:0


P-63 Airacobra

Built by Bell in Wheatfield, NY
“Of the nine new fighter designs tested by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) in 1942-43, only one was produced in quantity – the Bell P-63. This aircraft was designed to address the shortcomings of the P-39 Airacobra. Although similar in appearance to the P-39, the P-63 was in fact a completely redesigned airplane and only a few parts are interchangeable between the two aircraft.”
Source/Link: http://ghostsquadron.org/aircraft/27#aircraft_info


Supermarine Spitfire – Mark XVI

Spitfire

“More than 22,000 “Spits” were built in nearly thirty variants including the “Seafire” a carrier-based fighter of the Fleet Air Arm. The Spit is the only fighter aircraft of the Second World War that was in continuous production before, during and after the conflict. The Vintage Wings of Canada Spitfire is a Rolls Royce Merlin-equipped Mk XVI and is painted in the markings of the Royal Canadian Air Force’s legendary 421 Squadron.”

Info Source: http://www.vintagewings.ca/Aircraft/tabid/66/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/1/The-FL-William-Harper-Supermarine-Spitfire-XVI.aspx


C-47 Skytrain “Whiskey 7”

“Few aircraft are as well known, were so widely used or used as long as the C-47. Affectionately nicknamed the “Gooney Bird,” this aircraft was adapted from the Douglas DC-3 commercial airliner. The U.S. Army Air Corps ordered its first C-47s in 1940, and by the end of World War II, procured a total of 9,348. These C-47s carried personnel and cargo around the globe. They also towed troop-carrying gliders, dropped paratroops into enemy territory, and air evacuated sick or wounded patients. A C-47 could carry 28 passengers, 18-22 fully equipped paratroopers, about 6,000 lbs. of cargo or 18 stretchers and three medical personnel.” Source/Link: http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=502


de Havilland DH-115 Mk55 Vampire

“Over 3300 Vampires were built worldwide and while many survive only an handful still fly today. Waterloo’s Mk 55 is a two seat trainer that was developed to teach pilots how to fly first generation jet aircraft. The Single seat Vampire was the first jet fighter to serve in the RCAF when 86 were delivered in 1946. Canadian Vampires were all retired by 1958. The Canadian Vampire was flown by the Blue Devils, the aerobatic team of No. 410 “Cougar” Squadron, performing across North America between 1949 and 1951. In 2014, the Vampires’ restoration was completed, and Waterloo Warbirds has made the Vampire available to the public every summer since. Our Vampire is a Mk 55 an export version of the T11. As a two-seater trainer, the Vampire T11 excelled. The side by side seating ensured both pilots had good visibility. The aircraft’s inherent stability and docility also made it a relatively safe and effective platform for instruction. Later, the Vampire provided advanced training and weapons instruction with rockets and bombs fitted under the wing. This compared favourably with the tandem cockpit and completely unarmed Meteor T7. Our Vampire rolled off the assembly line in October 1958 and entered service with the Swiss Airforce. It is now the only flying vampire in Canada and one of only a handful worldwide. Come out and get a glimpse of early jet aircraft design and hear that distinctive Vampire sound!” Source/Link: http://waterloowarbirds.com/Dehavilland-DH-115-Vampire


Canadair T-33 Mk3

“The Silver Star is more often referred to as the T-33 or T-Bird. The CT-133 Silver Star has a long and distinguished history with the Canadian Forces. The world’s first purpose-built jet trainer, the T-33 evolved from America’s first successful jet fighter. The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star that briefly flew operationally during the Second World War. Initially known as the P-80C, the trainer variant flew better than its single seat cousins. Powered by an Allison J33-35 single-shaft, turbojet engine with a thrust rating of 5,200 lbs, the improvements to the trainer meant it climbed faster, cruised better and overall was slightly faster than the fighter version. In May 1949, the designation for the aircraft was officially switched to T-33.The RCAF’s first introduction to the aircraft followed two years later, when the first of twenty Lockheed built T-33As were delivered on loan. The aircraft were known to the RCAF was the Silver Star Mk 1. This first batch was followed by a second loan of ten more aircraft. On 13 September 1951, Canadair signed a license agreement with Lockheed to build T-33 aircraft for the RCAF. The Canadair built version known internally as the CL-30 (and as the T-33ANX by Lockheed and the USAF) was to be powered by an uprated Nene 10 engine licensed by Rolls Royce and supplied by Orenda Ltd. Once in production, the aircraft were designated T-33 Silver Star Mk 3 by the RCAF. Initially, the RCAF ordered 576 aircraft. Eventually, a total of 656 aircraft would be delivered to the RCAF between 1952 and 1959. The “T-Bird” has been used by a wide variety of Air Force and Navy units and continues its valuable service.” Source/Link: http://waterloowarbirds.com/Canadair-T-33-Mako-Shark


P-51 Mustang

“The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang is an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was designed in 1940 by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to a requirement of the British Purchasing Commission for license-built Curtiss P-40 fighters. The prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, 102 days after the contract was signed and first flew on 26 October. The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-1710 engine, which, in its earlier variants, had limited high-altitude performance. It was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber (Mustang Mk I). The addition of the Rolls-Royce Merlin to the P-51B/C model transformed the Mustang’s performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or bettering that of the Luftwaffe’s fighters. The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a license-built version of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 66 two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and was armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2/AN Browning machine guns. Source/Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_P-51_Mustang


F4U Corsair

“The Vought F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought’s manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft but its difficult carrier landing performance rendered it unsuitable for Navy use until the carrier landing issues were overcome by the British Fleet Air Arm. The Corsair thus came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment: land-based use by the U.S. Marines.” Source/Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_F4U_Corsair


PT-26

“During 1943, USAAF Training Command received a number of complaints about durability issues with the plywood wings of the PT-19 and the PT-23 when exposed to the high heat and/or humidity of training bases located in Texas and Florida. Maintenance officers at the USAAF overhaul depots had been forced to order replacement of the wooden wing sections after only two to three months’ active service because of wood rot and ply separation issues. Subsequent to this incident, the USAAF incorporated a demand for all-metal wing sections on all future fixed-wing training aircraft.
The final variant was the PT-26 which used the L-440-7 engine. The Canadian-built versions of these were designated the Cornell for use by the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan which was centered in Canada.”
Photo credit: By FlugKerl2 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20773490
Source/Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairchild_PT-19


PT-17

pt17

“The Kaydet, the two-seater biplane introduced by Stearman Aircraft Division of Boeing in Wichita, Kan., in 1934, became an unexpected success during World War II. Despite its almost obsolete design, its simple, rugged construction made it ideal as a trainer for novice pilots for the U.S. Army Air Corps (PT-13/-17) and Navy (NS/N2S).” Source/Link: http://www.boeing.com/history/products/stearman-kaydet-trainer.page


BT-13 Valiant

“The Vultee BT-13 Valiant was an American World War II-era basic trainer aircraft built by Vultee Aircraft for the United States Army Air Corps, and later US Army Air Forces. A subsequent variant of the BT-13 in USAAC/USAAF service was known as the BT-15 Valiant, while an identical version for the US Navy was known as the SNV and was used to train naval aviators for the US Navy and its sister services, the US Marine Corps and US Coast Guard.”
Source/Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vultee_BT-13_Valiant


Helicopters

UH-60 Blackhawk

“The BLACK HAWK multi-role helicopter serves with the U.S. military and the armed forces of 28 other countries worldwide as a tough, reliable utility helicopter. During the last 40 years, this remarkable aircraft has fought its way in and out of countless combat zones to deliver and extract troops, save lives as a MEDEVAC or casualty evacuation platform, provide critical supplies to troops, deliver emergency supplies during natural disasters, and perform as an aerial firefighter and border patroller. Now the modern variant of this utility aircraft is taking on a new mission set — as an Armed Helicopter to provide fire suppression when supporting ground troops, as well as armed escort. With digital avionics, powerful GE engines, high strength airframe structures and composite wide chord rotor blades, today’s BLACK HAWK platform has better survivability and situational awareness, and can fly higher and carry more than its predecessors ever did. More than 4,000 BLACK HAWK aircraft of all types are in service worldwide today. The U.S. Army is the largest operator with 2,135 H-60 designated aircraft. The same aircraft sold internationally direct from Sikorsky acquires the S-70 designation.” Source/Link: https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/products/sikorsky-black-hawk-helicopter.html#variants


MH-60S

“The MH-60S Seahawk missions are Anti-Surface Warfare, combat support, humanitarian disaster relief, Combat Search and Rescue, aero medical evacuation, SPECWAR and organic Airborne Mine Countermeasures. The MH-60S replaced the aging fleet of H-46D helicopters, which led to significant reductions in costs per flight hour, mission aborts, component removals, and unscheduled maintenance actions. The MH-60S with its glass cockpit incorporates active matrix liquid crystal displays, used to facilitate pilot and co-pilot vertical and horizontal situation presentations.” Source/Link: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.displayPlatform&key=A1C74EA2-3917-416B-81C6-9CEB537C0594


Niagara County Sheriff OH-58

“The Niagara County Sheriff’s Office Aviation Unit has been in service since 1996. At that time, the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office acquired three Bell OH-58 helicopters from the Department of Defense. The Bell OH-58 is an observation type helicopter powered by a gas turbine engine. Presently, the Sheriff’s Office has one of these aircraft in service. The unit performs aviation operations in support of the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office and local police agencies. Typical operations include drug interdiction, search and rescue operations, routine patrol, aerial surveillance and Homeland Security patrol flights.” http://www.niagarasheriff.com/aviation-unit.html


CH-47 Chinook

“The CH-47F is an advanced multi-mission helicopter for the U.S. Army and international defense forces. It contains a fully integrated, digital cockpit management system, Common Aviation Architecture Cockpit and advanced cargo-handling capabilities that complement the aircraft’s mission performance and handling characteristics.”
Source/Link: https://www.boeing.com/defense/ch-47-chinook/


CBP EC120

The Airbus Helicopters EC120 aircraft is a medium-range, turbine-powered helicopter used by CBP’s Air and Marine Operations (AMO) primarily as a Light Observation Helicopter.
AMO’s EC120, flying with a single-pilot crew, provides a highly-effective aerial surveillance platform in the border desert areas where terrain can be difficult to traverse on foot. This helicopter is often used to assist CBP ground personnel in sign-cutting, which is the skill of detecting and interpreting the traces of activity people or animals may have left behind. The EC120 also has a low sound profile, excellent flight deck visibility, and exceptional maneuverability.
The EC120 design offers AMO the ability to conduct maintenance tasks with a limited need for specific tools, which significantly reduces the aircraft’s operating costs. A new design for the main blades makes them resistant to impact and corrosion free. In addition, the helicopter is equipped with energy absorbing seats for pilot, and passengers. Source/Link: https://www.cbp.gov/border-security/air-sea/aircraft-and-marine-vessels


Civil Air Patrol

CAP Cessna 172

“The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is one of the many air platforms used by the Civil Air Patrol. As the Official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, these aircraft are utilized in a variety of missions, from Search and Rescue, and air transport, to Humanitarian and Disaster Relief. This includes whole blood and organ transportation. These aircraft also have the capability of carrying an airborne radio communications repeater, to extend the range of radio communications networks. Aircraft on search missions are generally crewed by at least three qualified aircrew members: a Mission Pilot, responsible for the safe flying of the aircraft; a Mission Observer, responsible for Navigation, communications and coordination of the mission as well as ground observation; and a Mission Scanner who is responsible for looking for crash sites and damage clues. Additionally, the mission scanner may double as a Satellite Digital Imaging System (SDIS) operator. Most recently CAP aircrews have been working with the New York Air National Guard’s Syracuse-based 174th Attack Wing, home of the United States Air Force Reaper Training Program for remote control pilots and operators. As part of the program, CAP planes serve as escorts accompanying MQ-9 Reapers through commercial airspace to and from Military Operating Areas. These aircraft also serve as part of our Cadet Program and Aerospace Education. As part of the Cadet Program the Cadets get firsthand experience with our pilots in aircraft familiarization, and also get “stick time” the ability to fly and control the aircraft while in flight. Other aircraft CAP uses include: Cessna 182 Skylane, Cessna 206, Maule MT-235 and GippsAero GA8 Airvan.” For more information about these aircraft, CAP missions and our Cadet programs please visit; https://nyw.cap.gov/ or https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/


Please note: The aircraft pictured above might not be the exact paint scheme or tail flash shown. All display aircraft are subject to change without notice.